The Top 10 Best-Selling Irish and Celtic Mythology Books

I just ran the numbers: here are the top 10 Irish and Celtic mythology books IrishMyths.com readers are buying, starting with the number one best-seller, The Mammoth Book of Celtic Myths.

The Mythology of Samhain: 6 Stories That Give Samhain Added Significance

Did you know that Samhain served as the backdrop for many of Irish mythology’s greatest battles and events? Here are 6 Samhain myths for celebrating the year’s spookiest season.

A Brief History of Samhain: When (and Where) Did Halloween’s Celtic Predecessor Get Its Start?

No history of Halloween would be complete without a history of Samhain. Uncover the archaeological and historical evidence behind Samhain’s ancient Celtic origins.

What Is Samhain? (Definition and Etymology)

What in the Halloween is the definition of Samhain? Where did the word come from? And why did the ancient Celts decide to celebrate Samhain on the 31st night of October?

Who Is the Irish God of Death? A Morbid Introduction to the Morrígan, Donn, and Bilé

Irish mythology is rife with ruthless and ritual death. So is there a god and/or goddess from the Irish pantheon who is in charge of the recently deceased, à la the Grim Reaper or Charon from Greek mythology? Turns out there’s not just one Irish god of death, there are (at least) three.

Lughnasa Explained: How to Celebrate Lughnasa Like an Ancient Celt

Uncover the origins of Lughnasa (a.k.a. Lughnasadh), a summer harvest festival during which “first fruits” are gathered, mountains are climbed, and races are run, all in honor of the Celtic sun-god Lugh and his foster-mother, Tailtiu.

What Is a Banshee? The Mythic Origins of Ireland’s Most Infamous Shrieking Spirit

A brief biography of Irish folklore’s most frightening fay, the banshee. Learn why this vociferous, vatic vocalist haunts the households of those about to perish.

Was Merlin Inspired by Irish Mythology? The Search for the Original Celtic “Wild Man”

“Man flees to the forest” is a common motif in Celtic storytelling traditions. But which “Wild Man” came first: the Welsh Myrddin Wyllt, the Scottish Lailoken, the Irish Suibhne Geilt, or someone else?